Register
Page 111 of 111 FirstFirst ... 1161101109110111
Results 1,101 to 1,106 of 1106
  1. #1101
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    Cool stuff indeedy! We're lucky they don't make it to land very often.
    Last edited by ilan; 04-18-2019 at 12:22 AM.
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

  2. #1102
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    April full moon shines in Virgo
    Bruce McClure in TONIGHT | April 18, 2019



    On both April 18 and April 19, 2019, you’ll see a round full-looking moon in your sky. The moon turns full in front of the constellation Virgo the Maiden at 11:12 UTC on April 19. That means that, from some places worldwide, the moon turns full before dawn on April 19. More about the precise time of the full moon shortly.

    As darkness falls around the world on April 18, it’ll be an almost-full waxing gibbous moon in the neighborhood of Spica, the constellation Virgo’s one and only 1st-magnitude star.

    Now back to that full moon time. If you live in Alaska, the western portions of Canada or the United States, Mexico or Central America, this full moon instant actually happens before (or at) dawn April 19. (See worldwide map below.) At North American and U.S. time zones, the moon turns full during the morning hours on April 19, at 8:12 a.m. ADT, 7:12 a.m. EDT, 6:12 a.m. CDT, 5:12 a.m. MDT, 4:12 a.m. PDT, 3:12 a.m. Alaskan Time and 1:12 a.m. Hawaiian Time.

    By definition, the moon is full at the instant that it’s exactly 180 degrees away from the sun in ecliptic longitude. Or another way of putting it, the sun-moon elongation equals 180 degrees at full moon. Click here to find the sun-moon elongation at this moment, keeping in mind that a positive number refers to a waxing moon and a negative number to a waning moon.

    Technicalities aside, however, the moon appears full to the eye for a few days. That’s because at the vicinity of full moon, the moon remains more or less opposite the sun for a day or two. From around the world, expect to see a full-looking moon lighting up the nighttime from dusk until dawn tonight (April 18) and tomorrow night (April 19).

    In the Northern Hemisphere, we often call the April full moon the Pink Moon, to celebrate the return of certain wildflowers. Other Northern Hemisphere names for this full moon are Egg Moon, Sprouting Grass Moon, or Easter Moon.

    In the Southern Hemisphere, where it’s autumn, this April full moon counts as the Southern Hemisphere’s Hunter’s Moon – the full moon that immediately follows the Harvest Moon. One month ago, the full moon on March 21, 2019, was the Southern Hemisphere’s Harvest Moon because it was the closest full moon to the southern autumn equinox. The Harvest and Hunter’s Moons usher in a procession of moonlit nights, because the moon rises fairly soon after sunset for several nights in a row. If you live at middle or far southerly latitudes, enjoy your April Hunter’s Moon.

    By the way, last month’s full moon also shone in front of the constellation Virgo. So, in 2019, we have two full moons in a row taking place in front of the same constellation: Virgo. Each full moon recurs about 30 degrees east of the previous full moon, as measured by the background stars of the zodiac. Even so, it’s possible for two full moons in a row to occur in Virgo, because Virgo is the largest constellation of the zodiac and the second-largest overall.
    __________________________________________________

    "Watch the skies. Everywhere. Keep looking. Keep watching the skies." (Quote from The Thing from Another World, 1951) - ilan
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

  3. #1103
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    RECTANGLE UFO SPOTTED MOVING OVER OREGON
    Roger Marsh, MUFON | 4/15/2019


    Dallas, Oregon. Credit: Google

    An Oregon witness at Dallas reported watching a large, gray, rectangular-shaped object reminiscent of an aircraft carrier moving overhead, according to testimony in Case 92560 from the Mutual UFO Network (MUFON) witness reporting database.

    The witness was sitting outside after dark on a lawn chair watching a movie on a laptop at 10:05 p.m. on June 7, 2018.

    “I was aware of a noise like a plane, but it wasn't until it was right overhead that I looked up to see a large gray object flying north to south,” the witness stated. “It seemed to be flying rather low for a jet liner, but still several thousand feet up. It had two white lights in the front and two red lights in the rear. It appeared to have no wings and a flat bottom. Its rectangular shape reminded me of a barge or aircraft carrier. Its corners did not appear to be rounded but more squared off, hence the resemblance to a barge. It continued from over my head south until it was out of sight. It was not quite as loud as a jet plane but made a noise very similar. I continued to watch it and noticed the light pattern did not change as if it was two separate planes flying together. It flew south over the nearby town of Dallas until it was out of sight.”

    Oregon MUFON State Director Tom Bowden closed this case as an Unknown Aerial Vehicle.
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

  4. #1104
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    Tiny star flares 10 times brighter than the Sun
    Korey Haynes, Astronomy | Published: Thursday, April 18, 2019

    Though the small star is typically too dim to see, a flare observed in 2017 boosted its normal brightness by some 10,000 times.


    Illustration shows extremely active, tiny star.
    University of Warwick/Mark Garlick

    On August 13, 2017, the Next Generation Transit Survey (NGTS) telescope spotted an intense solar flare from a tiny star barely bigger than Jupiter. But despite this star’s diminutive size, the flare gave off as much energy as 80 billion megatons of TNT. That’s 10 times as powerful as the strongest flare ever observed on our own Sun. It’s also the coolest star ever observed to give off such a hot flare, and the spectacular outburst is teaching astronomers the power of small stars.

    Light it up

    The tiny star bears the unwieldly name ULAS J224940.13-011236.9 and sits 250 light-years from Earth. In fact, classified as an L dwarf, it only barely qualifies as a star. “Any lower in mass and it would definitely be a brown dwarf,” said James Jackman, lead author of the discovery paper, in a press release. Brown dwarfs are sub-stars, too big to count as a planet, but too small to sustain the nuclear fusion in their cores that defines a star. Most telescopes, including NGTS, can’t even see dim little ULAS J2249−0112 during normal times. But the flare lit up the star clearly in the data, boosting it to 10,000 times its normal brightness. Jackman and his team published their findings April 17 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters.

    Because flares last only a few minutes – this one was visible for 9.5 minutes – it takes luck or a special instrument like NGTS, which looks at wide patches of the sky over quick time intervals, to spot such phenomena.


    NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory caught an
    X2.0-class solar flare erupt off our own sun in 2014.

    Astronomers have spied powerful flares from tiny stars before, but they are rare. In general, smaller stars like this one have fewer, less powerful flares than larger dwarf stars. ULAS J2249−0112 is just the second L-dwarf flare ever seen from the ground and the sixth L-dwarf to be seen flaring at all, and this flare is the brightest yet seen in an ultra-cool star. Astronomers weren’t sure until now that such small, cool stars had enough energy in their chromospheres, or outer layers, to support such powerful flares.

    But the find shows that even tiny stars can pack quite the punch.
    Last edited by ilan; 04-20-2019 at 01:15 PM.
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

  5. #1105
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    Watch for moon, Jupiter, Lyrid meteors
    EarthSky in TONIGHT | April 21, 2019


    The moon is just a few days past full on the nights of April 21 and 22. Meanwhile, the Lyrid meteor shower is expected to put forth its greatest number of meteors during the predawn hours on April 22 and especially April 23. If you’re a veteran meteor-watcher, you’re already shaking your fist at the moon. Its glare will drown out all but the brightest Lyrids. However, the moon offers its own delights, sweeping past Jupiter – the largest planet in our solar system and second-brightest planet in our skies – on these mornings. Also, you can look for the bright star Vega, which nearly marks the radiant point of the Lyrid meteor shower. Both Jupiter and Vega should have no trouble overcoming the moon-drenched skies. Find them, enjoy them … and maybe you’ll spot a meteor, too!

    By the mornings of April 24 and 25, the moon will have passed Jupiter to appear near Saturn.

    The greatest number of Lyrid meteors usually falls in the few hours before dawn. That’s when the radiant point – near the star Vega in the constellation Lyra – is highest in the sky. For that reason, that’s when you’re likely to see the most meteors, albeit, this year, in the light of the moon.
    __________________________________________________ ______

    Lots of cool stuff going on. Take some time and give the sky a gander at the appropriate times mentioned in the article. You'll be rewarded! - ilan
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

  6. #1106
    Moderator at Work ilan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Celestial Fields
    Posts
    8,195
    Rep Power
    233
    Astronomers Find Stars Streaming from Our Galaxy’s Biggest Cluster
    Monica Young, Sky & Telescope| April 22, 2019

    Astronomers have discovered a stream of stars pulled from Omega Centauri, the largest and most brilliant globular cluster around the Milky Way — and perhaps a one-time dwarf galaxy.


    A view of the iconic Omega Centauri globular cluster.
    ESO / INAF-VST / OmegaCAM; Acknowledgement: A. Grado, L. Limatola / INAF-Capodimonte Observatory

    Omega Centauri (NGC 5139, or Omega Cen for short) is unusually brilliant, massive, and huge: 10 million stars squeeze into a sphere about 150 light-years wide. What most puzzles astronomers, though, is that its stars come in at least three distinct populations, suggesting the cluster came together over billions of years instead of all at once.

    Astronomers have long thought this peculiar globular might be something else altogether: the remains of a galaxy that came too close to the Milky Way. Torn apart by our galaxy’s gravity, its stars would have streamed into the halo and looped around the galaxy, leaving a small cluster-like core behind.

    Now, Rodrigo Ibata (University of Strasbourg, France) and colleagues report new evidence for this theory in Nature Astronomy: the long-sought detection of a stellar stream belonging to Omega Cen.

    Researchers have been looking for (and finding) the stellar remains of torn-apart clusters and galaxies ever since the first streams were discovered in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, but it’s been rough going. “Streams have been hard to detect because they are so low in density and therefore hard to detect visually,” explains Jeremy Webb (University of Toronto), who was not involved in the study. “Most do not stand out visually amongst foreground and background stars.”
    __________________________________________

    Star clusters are amazing looking stellar phenomena. Now, we think some could be the remnants of a celestial "disaster." - ilan
    Last edited by ilan; Today at 12:20 PM.
    Beginner's Guide for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/showthread.php?2...-you-should-do

    Kodi Options for Rocket, NFPS and IKS66...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php?71-Kodi

    Check the Announcement Section...
    http://iptvtalk.net/forumdisplay.php...-Announcements

 

 
Page 111 of 111 FirstFirst ... 1161101109110111

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •